2023 Annual Convening Experience

@ Caribe Hilton, San Juan PR | 2nd floor, Flamingo Room

Welcome to our 2023 Annual Convening!

We have gone through significant transformations together. We have taken responsibility as a collective to make meaningful connections, be accountable to each other, generate authentic ideas and have strategic conversations that leverage our impact.

After all the turbulence we have gone through collectively, in 2019 the focus was on disaster recovery. In 2020, we deepened on equity, diversity, inclusion (EDI) and began to remember our interconnectedness to create a more equitable world. 2021 was the year of recognizing that while we may be different, we all share the purpose of leading social change. In 2022, we accepted the challenge and responsibility to actively lean In and co-create together the present and future of the social sector in Puerto Rico. This year, 2023, we took a step back, but only to move forward! We delved into how we have evolved throughout our history, which led us to expand our visions, foster informed decision making, and align ourselves to take collective action toward the future.

This year we designed an experience to deepen strategic conversations about how equity is being mobilized. We are ready! We have transitioned together and experienced the new changes coming to the social sector, our narrative has transformed over the years and our vision has evolved stronger. By expanding and aligning collective action, we will be able to address complex challenges and amplify our impact.

Schedule

Wednesday, October 18

During the first day, we delve into the historical context of the impact of natural disasters in Puerto Rico in terms of: population density, public policies, access to information, governance transparency and fundamental services such as housing, power energy, agriculture and food security. We go backwards, but only to move forward! This knowledge is fundamental, to analyze critically and to contrast data on the composition, characteristics and continuously evolving trends within Puerto Rico over the past decade.

As we have these broad conversations that move our perspectives we must ask ourselves: How are we expanding our ways of thinking to make informed and innovative decisions? How are we responding to the changes ahead for Puerto Rico?

8:30am - 9:00am Registration & Breakfast

9:00am - 9:30am Welcome to our annual convening

Honoring the space that’s welcoming us on these days.

9:30am - 11:00am Commonwealth of Calamity: Learning from Puerto Rico’s Disaster History

Brief:

Disasters are moments in which power is contested by individuals, communities, and the state. Individuals negotiate for better relief efforts, communities galvanize or come undone, and the state chooses how or if it should respond at all in the aftermath. Economic, social, and political motives often drive the varied responses to catastrophe. This session discusses Puerto Rico’s disaster history and its effect on relations with the U.S. The themes of colonization, debt, and local relief will be highlighted to offer some solutions on how Puerto Rico can better handle disaster relief in the future. By examining key disasters throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries as case studies, this session showcases how learning from history can inform better practices of present-day collective action.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

Puerto Rico has been pounded by natural disasters in the past few years: hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and landslides. These catastrophes have taken a heavy toll on Puerto Rico’s socio-economic development. Before all these natural disasters devastated the island, Puerto Rico was already struggling to recover from the economic recession of the last decade and an overwhelming public debt.

While we have been pushed to respond to these realities and advance Puerto Rico’s recovery from the front lines, we are currently at a turning point where we must pause to analyze how the last 20 years of history will transform the decisions of Puerto Rico’s present and future. Transition is inevitable and the narrative shift has taken place. Our speaker walks us through data that expands our knowledge and amplifies our vision!

KEY INSIGHTS

  • Disasters are inherently political. The disaster is an analytical construct that unfolds over time, not an isolated event. Viewing hurricanes in this way to underlay structural disaster.
  • We need to explore the role of history in disaster and how it changes the conversation
  • We go through a major hurricane every two and a half years, this requires change in policy and the entire mindset. This reality needs to be addressed from the system.
  • There is no such thing as a natural disaster. It happens because of lack of: Infrastructure, Climate change, Housing conditions, Political conditions,
  • The colonization of Puerto Rico has played an important role in disaster management since the first colonization by Spain. This unilaterally changed Puerto Rico’s economy.
  • Due to the status quo since the conception of the Commonwealth, Puerto Rico has lost autonomy. The structure did not provide for citizen involvement.
  • Throughout the history of Puerto Rico’s economic development, industrialization destroyed the massive local agricultural industry. Agriculture was never a priority in economic development throughout history.
  • Decisions made in the past have repercussions in the lack of autonomy in the recovery process, in the poor housing conditions, in people leaving Puerto Rico to seek refuge in other places.

SPEAKER

Ian Seavey Predoctoral Fellow in International Security Studies at Yale University’s Jackson School of Global Affairs

11:00am - 12:30pm Sociodemographic Context of Puerto Rico and its Municipalities: where are we?

Brief:

Understanding socio demographic data is fundamental for informed decision-making, effective policy formulation, equitable resource distribution, and the overall development and well-being of a country’s population. 

The panorama of population traits in Puerto Rico and its municipalities will be shared, as well as the changes in recent decades. Additionally, the geographic distribution of various traits across the jurisdiction and demographic prospects in the near future will be shown.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

Demographic data tell us more than just a person’s gender and geographic location. Demographic data allows us to access detailed information about the social, economic and living characteristics of communities.  Demographic data can also shed light on unique qualities that could help us go deeper into our community programs and how to transform our grantmaking practice. Demographic data can also give us insight into whether a strategy or policy has really made a difference.

During this session we break down why socio-demographic information is useful for the philanthropic landscape and help us to analyze context and guide us to anticipate the future and make informed decisions. As changemakers investing in the socioeconomic realities of Puerto Rico, understanding the context of the social sector and the communities we serve ensures that we can move ever closer to equitable and relevant philanthropic practices.

KEY INSIGHTS

  • Understanding how past decisions affected economic planning and decision making guides us to make more informed decisions for the future.
  • The population was constantly growing over the past decades, therefore the decisions of municipalities were “do more because there would be more of us”.
  • However, as time went by, the equations did not match the socio-demographic growth. 
  • It was necessary to change the planning mentality for a Puerto Rico that we had not seen before. 
  • The population has decreased 605 thousand less people since 2020. This gives us an idea of how we should be planning for the future.
  • The maps are a communication tool and a guide to make informed decisions.
  • The decline in the population of children has affected the education system and how they provide services based on enrollment.
  • Socio-demographic data gives us a different perspective on how we are going to address the population change that has aggressively transitioned to being old (compared to the US which has increased approximately 9%, Puerto Rico is increasing by 39%).
  • The opportunities and challenges revealed by these data are to improve access to care and health for the elderly, to make infrastructures responsive to functional diversity, to reveal the changes that need to be made to address the new educational reality and to address the gaps in the community.

SPEAKER

Alberto Velázquez Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics

12:30pm - 1:30pm Lunch

1:30pm - 3:00pm Agriculture in Puerto Rico: a Statistical Perspective

Brief:

This presentation offers statistics on Puerto Rico’s agriculture and food security, aligning with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to end hunger and promote food security. It explores the historical significance of agriculture in human cultures and delves into Puerto Rico’s agricultural legacy, as well as the contemporary challenges it faces. Additionally, we will discuss research on agricultural reforms in past centuries in PR, culminating in an interactive question and answer session.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

We learned more about the impact of natural disasters and the fiscal crisis in Puerto Rico, we delved into the impact it has had on socio-demographic development on the island and for this session we delved into the direct impact it has on fundamental services such as food sovereignty.

Since the last Census of Agriculture in 2012 the number of farms and the amount of land in farms in Puerto Rico experienced a large decrease. Due to the conditions caused by the hurricanes, the agroecological movement has focused on disaster recovery. As well, communities experienced a severe lack of access to services that affected food security across the island. Our speaker breaks down the latest data related to the agricultural workforce, the amount of acreage available, the impact of this sector on socio-economic development, and gives us an idea of how we can align collective efforts to impact this decreasing sector.

KEY INSIGHTS:

  • Agriculture is the most important activity for every human being.
  • A large percentage of Puerto Rico’s foods is imported and this places us in a situation of food insecurity.
  • 1 in 3 suffers from food insecurity, and reported that in order to survive they had to stop eating one of their meals. 
  • The current salary/income does not ensure the subsistence of farmers, which leads to the fact that it would be a complementary activity.
  • Agricultural reform – Beginning of a more active role in public policies and incentives for manufacturing industries to come, and access begins to increase. 
  • The importance of that land law and its changes…how this affects who can harvest and how and in turn who owns land.
  • “We need more philanthropy and allies supporting agriculture and it is one of those areas that if we come together we can make a bigger impact.” (Charlotte, Hispanic Federation).
  • Agriculture is where I have found the leaders of the future, it’s where we get more of the diaspora coming back and leadership growth (Kinyta, Peter Alfond).
  • Agriculture is a way to advance educational, financial and personal health but also to have a better health system as individuals and as a community. 
  • “These sectors need money but also hands, connections, allies and collaborations. It requires an integration of the private sector, government flexibility requirements and limiting regulations.”
  • “Interesting changes are taking place and we are seeing how collaboration in different sectors is giving good results.
  • “As long as we don’t have lands, how can we cultivate? So we have to talk about land tenure. This is part of colonization, the fertile land is given to solar panels so we do not have clear strategies to address these problems” 

SPEAKER

Dr. Francisco Pesante Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics

3:00pm - 4:15pm Housing Sector: characteristics of the economy and post-disaster context

Brief:

We will delve into the current post-disaster landscape, with a focus on key information sources. This exploration will encompass an overview of the economic and housing sectors’ essential attributes within this context. Additionally, we will examine pertinent variables of interest and sources of data, culminating in an interactive question and answer session.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

Continuing with the impact that the disasters in Puerto Rico have had on essential services, we jump to analyze the current condition of adequate and affordable housing services in Puerto Rico. In this section, we expand on the access and distribution of recovery funds focused on housing, the rehabilitation of properties on the island and the impact on the most vulnerable populations, the communities most impacted by the disasters, the environmental degradation and the increase of the diaspora in Puerto Rico.

KEY INSIGHTS:

  • Housing is seen from two pillars:
    • Housing to generate profit, as an investment instrument
    • Housing as a unit of social reproduction
  • Housing is a human right
  • The provision of housing is more than construction, it is a political issue, the power dynamics that are articulated in society. Housing as a construction project and as a political proposal that must be addressed.  
  • It is a mistake to try to understand or solve housing issues by focusing exclusively on the vacancy sector.
  • Affordability is a way to measure and understand the housing issues, how much a family spends on housing as a percentage of their income. If we talk about affordability, conditions are quite precarious in PR. 
  • With the drop in housing construction, it has made it less affordable. However, the data does not point to the fact that the problem will be solved by building, of course we have to build but the question is where and for whom? 
  • There is substantial federal money available that has not yet manifested in Puerto Rican reality.
  • From the 1 million units that reported damage, only 32% (only 151,000) were officially inspected. 
  • 90% of the contracts for reconstruction are awarded to U.S. companies. If we are thinking about increasing revenues, using the reconstruction funds as a catalyst we have to change these statistics for local companies to receive these funds.

SPEAKER

Deepak Lamba-Nieves Center for a New Economy

4:15pm - 5:00pm Unpacking the Short-Term Rental Dilemma

Brief:

In this presentation, we’ll explore the findings of a study on short-term rentals in Puerto Rico, focusing on their significant impact on the economy, communities, and individuals.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

Puerto Rico has had a substantial increase in the provision of short-term and vacational rentals, although this has been profitable for many people (not necessarily Puerto Ricans), in this session we discuss the impact that these rentals have on community development. We question how the landscape would look considering the voice and input of the communities that are affected by these rentals, who really benefit from this trending practice and how do we ensure that we do not support practices that continue to displace the locals and encourage colonization.

KEY INSIGHTS:

  • The communities are requesting regulations on the maximum number of properties a person can own and rent controls so that locals can have the ability to remain in their communities.
  • The lack of community-friendly regulations and policies is what worsens the situation and continues to make it unaffordable.
    93% of units dedicated to short-term rental are full houses or apartments
  • The highest density of short-term rentals is in Culebra
    Puerto Rico’s regulations are not oriented to protect housing
    Short-term rentals promote destitution and communities poor quality of life
  • Most owners do not live in the communities where they rent, they are members of the diaposora, beneficiaries of 20 law and therefore they do not understand their context.

SPEAKERS

Charlotte Gossett Navarro Hispanic Federation

Dulce del Rio-Pineda Mujeres de Islas

Mariana Reyes Taller Comunidad La Goyco

Lyvia N. Rodríguez del Valle El Enjambre

5:00am - 6:30am Networking & Cocktails

Thursday, October 19

 

On our first day, we immersed ourselves in data and information to expand our perspectives and critically analyze our efforts, especially our collective ones. On this second day, we will keep in mind, how can we expand to align our actions with other sectors? We continue to engage in strategic conversations, exploring alignments, and collaborations that will strengthen the purpose of the philanthropic ecosystem in the development of Puerto Rico.

For this second day, we must ask ourselves: How do we envision or imagine Philanthropy expanding efforts with the collective?; What are our organizations doing to expand collective efforts that advance equity?

8:00am - 9:00am Peer Learning: Centering Equity in our Communities

Breakfast Co-hosted with Magic Cabinet where they will share their practices through a Peer Learning Session: Centering Equity and Communities. We are thrilled to hear more about our new member in order to keep building meaningful connections between our ecosystem!

9:30am - 11:00am Puerto Rico in the 2020 Census: Ethnicity and Race Reporting

Brief:

We continue to delve in the census data which helps identify disparities and inequalities in society based on factors like age, gender, ethnicity, income, and education. This knowledge is crucial for promoting social inclusion and advocating for policies that promote equality. 

The release of 2020 Census redistricting data provides a new snapshot of the racial and ethnic composition of the country as a result of improvements in the design of the race and ethnicity questions, processing and coding. The improvements and changes enabled a more thorough and accurate depiction of how people self-identify, yielding a more accurate portrait of how people report their Hispanic origin and race within the context of a two-question format.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

Data is relevant as long as we can interpret and implement it! During the first day we were breaking down the impact of disasters and the crisis in the socio-demographic context of Puerto Rico. For this session, we dig into similar data from a different perspective as we explore how it affects the advancement of equity and systemic change.

KEY INSIGHTS:

  • Socio-demographic data has been drastically affected by recent hurricanes, and the pandemic.
  • The content and questions asked in the census from 2010 to 2020 have changed and evolved over the last decade to include other races, ethnicities, etc.
  • People began to respond longer and more fully because there was greater identification in the census questions and content. 
  • Different answers in 2020 and how they identify themselves, that is why the census changes so much. 
  • When people mark “Puerto Rican” as “race”, it has to be coded as “some other race” and this can cause a gap when producing estimates.
  • The data is important if we can contextualize them, for example in political terms and how people relate and identify with certain terms
  • “The term “Afro-descendiente” is a different individual campaign than the term “Afro-Latino.”
  • How the question has been worded is impacted by where the person is living, how they interpret these terms from the socio demographic context. All of this impacts the responses that are received and therefore how these results are estimated.
  • We have to look at Puerto Rico by regions, municipalities, communities and populations; it cannot be agglomerated as a whole. This way we can have more accurate information.

SPEAKERS

Merarys Rios-Vargas U.S. Census Bureau

Rachel Marks U.S. Census Bureau

11:00am - 12:00pm Pathways to leveraging the federal tax credits for solar in Puerto Rico

Brief:

Having philanthropic discussions about solar solutions holds immense value as it addresses critical global challenges related to energy access, climate change, and social equity. Given the opportunity of the $1 billion Puerto Rico Energy Resilience Fund it is time we have a conversation of to discussion how philanthropy can be a catalytic for these funds to promote sustainable energy access, foster innovation, improve health and well-being, and ultimately contribute to a more sustainable and equitable Puerto Rico.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

Focusing the conversation on aligning collective action across sectors to advance equity, in this session we discussed the solar landscape, the incentives available, how they apply to the communities we serve, and the imminent need to join efforts with other sectors to know more about these funds. This discussion was to encourage discussion towards the solar sector, generate new ideas as a collective and formulate strategies together. This session gives us a critical analysis of different models of how to use public funds as a way to support communities and advance equity.

KEY INSIGHTS

  • Philanthropy can contribute in workforce training for community residents 
  • Building alliances with NGOs and local governments
  • We must build a sustainable structure within the community so that the transformation can be sustained over time and it can be relevant for communities.
  • We have to create projects that promote communities to become independent. 
  • We have to transition from thought leadership to action leadership.
  • The solar system has now become more important and relevant in the wake of the hurricanes in Puerto Rico; specially in communities that live in multi-family buildings because they do not have the same access to solar. 
  • “How do we tell a family with challenges and income disparities like more than the average in Puerto Rico to invest 70% in structure to have some energy resilience?”

SPEAKERS

Joe Evans Kresge Foundation

Jorge Gaskins Barrio Eléctrico

Carlos Vázquez ConSOLcio

12:00pm - 1:00pm Lunch

Optional Session

12:00pm - 1:00pm Optional Session: Filantropía Puerto Rico's Annual Meeting

Brief:

In this session, we will give you an overview of FiPR’s key accomplishments and efforts to continue building impactful social investment.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

As the main connector of the philanthropic ecosystem, we have been doing the hard work of actively listening to the voices of our members, grantmakers, trustees, partners and those who want to invest capital in Puerto Rico’s social development. Our focus has been to ensure that we all mobilize systemic change and advance equity. Filantropía Puerto Rico aims to be of value to its membership and to be able to sustain spaces where the philanthropic ecosystem can amplify their impact. Our intention is to encourage philanthropic entities to commit themselves to Puerto Rico in the long term.

Through this session, we broke down our strategic planning framework for the next years (2023-2027), how we continue to serve philanthropy by creating and sustaining infrastructures to amplify the voices of the philanthropic ecosystem, building capacity, creating  meaningful connections and leveraging their investments. Furthermore, we explored how we expand that philanthropy through our initiatives using philanthropic practices based on trust, raising awareness about the strengths, innovations and needs of Puerto Rico. As well as generate and curate data on how philanthropy can address challenges and opportunities in Puerto Rico for strategic philanthropy. We work to attract resources for equity and justice to Puerto Rico and we collaborate with other stakeholders to achieve objectives that advance systemic change and equity.

KEY INSIGHTS

XXXXXX

Speakers:

Glenisse Pagán Filantropía Puerto Rico

Anja Paonessa Filantropía Puerto Rico

1:00pm - 2:30pm Billions: The power of catalytic capital

Brief:

Puerto Rico’s challenges require an integrated approach if we want to solve the inequities. Blended capital is the strategic integration or blending of different forms of capital, typically from public, private, and philanthropic sources, to achieve social and environmental impact alongside financial returns. It will be a rich discussion to understand a method of financing that seeks to address complex challenges and drive sustainable development by leveraging diverse types of funding.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

To align collective actions we must understand in detail how blended capital works and how we can apply it to address complex challenges. The philanthropic ecosystem in Puerto Rico has responded to critical periods at the front line, sustaining the social sector and promoting initiatives that often result in public policies and legislative measures. Given the drastic changes ahead, during this session we discussed the importance of leveraging public, private and philanthropic funds to mobilize that capital in sectors of utmost importance and growth such as agriculture, solar landscape, climate change, disaster preparedness and the sustainable development of Puerto Rico. We also discussed blended capital as more than an instrument, but an investment structure that allows multiple investors to participate in advancing equity and systemic change.

KEY INSIGHTS

  • We need to make a paradigm shift; it invites us to step back and look at the problem from the outside to have a different effect on what we build.
  • The word “business” has changed. For the first time we are talking about economic performance and social impact.
  • If we are going to talk about equity and poverty we have to maximize the full spectrum of funding.
  • The influence we have is what is changing the world. 
  • How can we get the most out of what little we have, by being catalytic agents!
  • We have to change the mindset, the important thing is where the capital is and how we can put it to work for communities
  • Catalytic capital is defined as capital that accepts disproportionate risk or concessionary returns to generate positive impact and enable third party investment that otherwise would not be possible, has been at the forefront of this push.

SPEAKER

Eduardo Carrera Platform for Social Impact

2:30pm - 4:00pm Puerto Rico Economic Situation: What does the data show us?

Brief:

Puerto Rico economic trajectory has been erratic. As in previous periods, the economy is now growing but significant challenges remain: poverty has increased, and the likelihood of future growth is not promising. I will discuss data on the demographic dynamics, employment, poverty, and inflation, among other economic aspects.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

How can philanthropy in Puerto Rico can combine efforts to ensure relevance and permanence through the impact of our projects? We are experiencing a critical turning point, where the landscape of all sectors needs to shift in order to address the realities that lie ahead. In this last session, we bring together what we have discussed in these two days: the history of Puerto Rico and the current data after the disasters that have affected the island, thus being able to make informed and wise decisions for the future. The data shows us a path for strategies, elevates our perspectives on social issues that have confronted Puerto Rico for decades, and brings us back to what we will do with this information to ensure that we redirect our collective actions in the same direction.

KEY INSIGHTS

  • Growth will not be sustainable if we do not create a socio-economic model for Puerto Rico.
  • Puerto Rico has lost 11.8% of its inhabitants between 2010 and 2020. The municipalities that have lost the most have in common those affected by earthquakes, floods zones and gentrification.
  • There is an imbalance between the demand for housing and what is available.
  • Unemployment rate in Puerto Rico has never been at 6%
  • A survey between 2020-2021 shows that after the pandemic with the Program Unemployment Assistance (PUA) entrepreneurship began to increase.
  • In order to have real socio-economic growth, we must develop all the sectors.
  • The municipalities that have not lost much population have been because the locals have been replaced by Act 20, people outside of Puerto Rico, from the diaspora, which has caused gentrification. We would have to analyze that impact in a different way.
  • The unfortunate thing that the economy is currently growing is that it has given the government a false illusion of growth, when in reality there is a lot of planning that is needed for this to be sustainable. We need to establish an economic development project that includes everyone and is sustainable.
  • We cannot only talk about increasing the minimum salary, but also about reducing the cost of living.

SPEAKER

José Caraballo Cueto, PhD University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras

4:30pm - 7:30pm Junte social! at MADMi

We invite you to join us for a special celebration of the social sector as the conclusion of our 6th Annual Convening – Expand to Align Collective Action. 

We want to recognize and celebrate the collective achievements we have reached together in advancing equity for our communities and our Puerto Rico.

Join us at MADMi for an evening of celebration where we will have a community expo, music, cocktails, and more. 

  • When planning your visit to the Junte social, if you’re using Uber, simply search for “MADMi (Museo de Arte y Diseño De Miramar)” as your destination. For those opting for personal navigation, you can use Google Maps or Waze for the most accurate directions.
  • Available FREE vallet parking at the MADMi. You can tip the parking staff if you like 🙂

Ian Seavey

Yale University’s Jackson School of Global Affairs

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Alberto Velázquez

Puerto Rico Department of Statistics

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Dr. Francisco Pesante González

Puerto Rico Department of Statistics

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Deepak Lamba-Nieves

Center for a New Economy

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Charlotte Gossett Navarro

Hispanic Federation

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Dulce del Rio-Pineda

Mujeres de Islas

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Mariana Reyes

Taller Comunidad La Goyco

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Lyvia N. Rodríguez Del Valle

El Enjambre

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Merarys Rios-Vargas

U.S. Census Bureau

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Rachel Marks

U.S. Census Bureau

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Joe Evans

Kresge Foundation

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Eduardo Carrera

Platform for Social Impact

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José Carabllo Cueto, PhD

University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras

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Ian Seavey

Yale University’s Jackson School of Global Affairs

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Alberto Velázquez

Puerto Rico Department of Statistics

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Dr. Francisco Pesante González

Puerto Rico Department of Statistics

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Deepak Lamba-Nieves

Center for a New Economy

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Charlotte Gossett Navarro

Hispanic Federation

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Dulce del Rio-Pineda

Mujeres de Islas

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Mariana Reyes

Taller Comunidad La Goyco

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Lyvia Rodríguez

El Enjambre

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Merarys Rios-Vargas

U.S. Census Bureau

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Rachel Marks

U.S. Census Bureau

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Joe Evans

Kresge Foundation

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Eduardo Carrera

Platform for Social Impact

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José Carabllo Cueto, PhD

University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras

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NameOrganization NameJob PositionEmail
Dessy Bones ColónFundación de Mujeres en Puerto RicoOperations Officer[email protected]
Veronica Colón RosarioFundación de Mujeres en Puerto RicoExecutive Director[email protected]
Zulnette García RamosFundación de Mujeres en Puerto RicoProgram Officer[email protected]
Neeltje van Marissing MéndezFlamboyan FoundationSenior Managing Director Communications and External Affairs[email protected]
Darryl ChappellDarryl Chappell FoundationCEO[email protected]
Iris A. MedinaFlamboyan FoundationDirector, Revitalizing in Education[email protected]
Laura RexachFundación IntellectusExecutive Director[email protected]
Natcha AponteHumanidades Puerto RicoAccounting Officer Fiscal Area[email protected]
Dalila Rodriguez SaavedraHumanidades Puerto RicoGrants Director[email protected]
Jeirca MedinaTitín FoundationPublic Policy Director[email protected]
Yadira ValdiviaLiberty FoundationExecutive Director[email protected]
Baby JaunarenaFundación ColibríExecutive Director[email protected]
Jocelyn G. Capeles-PerezFundación Comunitaria de Puerto RicoPhilanthropic Services Manager & Public Relations[email protected]
Kate LandonBan Ki-moon FoundationExecutive Director[email protected]
Jesús Barriera BonillaHumanidades Puerto RicoProgram Officer[email protected]
Sonya Canetti MirabalHumanidades Puerto RicoExecutive Director[email protected]
Suheily ChaparroHumanidades Puerto RicoDirector, Programa de Iniciativas Propias[email protected]
Kinyta SmallsPeter Alfond FoundationExecutive Director, PR[email protected]
Sara Benitez DelgadoFundación de Mujeres en Puerto RicoCo-president[email protected]
Hazel ColónTitín FoundationProgram Director[email protected]
Jessie GuerreroHispanic FederationGrants and Contracts Manager[email protected]
Maya Procel Magic CabinetSr. Manager, Special Projects[email protected]
Almirca SantiagoHispanic FederationVice President for Grants and Capacity Building[email protected]
Elena PérezMagic CabinetProgram Officer[email protected]
Zach GrossnickleMagic CabinetSr. Manager, Brand and Communications[email protected]
Ivonne GómezFundación Gestos Positivos EconoDirector[email protected]
Christina EngelMagic CabinetChief Executive Officer[email protected]
Nicolle DíazFundación Segarra BoermanProgram Coordinator[email protected]
Jaime Toro-MonserrateHumanidades PRPresident Board of Directors[email protected]
José Ramón (Benny) BenítezFundación RimasGeneral Manager[email protected]
María Gabriela VelascoFundación RimasProgram Manager[email protected]
Héctor GonzálezFundación RimasBoard of Directors Member[email protected]
Anahí LazarteFundación RimasBoard of Directors Member
Lydia R. Figueroa CuevasFundación Triple SExecutive Director[email protected]
Franchesca E. Rivera CintrónFlamboyan FoundationDirector, K-3 Reading[email protected]
Rubiam MartínezFundación Ángel RamosProgram Officer[email protected]
Edenmari MontijoFundación Ángel RamosCommunications and Development Manager[email protected]
Keila LópezFundación Ángel RamosGrants and Program Manager[email protected]
Yarelis PagánFundación Ángel RamosProgram Officer[email protected]
Laura LópezFundación Ángel RamosExecutive Director[email protected]
Laura Navarro RosadoFlamboyan FoundationManaging Director, Education[email protected]
Alexis OrtizThe Andrew W. Mellon FoundationSenior Program Associate[email protected]
Maritere Padilla RodriguezHispanic FederationDirector of Policy and Advocacy[email protected]
Mariemyr Ortiz PérezTriple S CHW Supervisor[email protected]
Maximilián Vega-VélezMaría Fund PRCoordinator of the SylC Trans and Non-Binary Initiative[email protected]
Raquela Delgado ValentínMaría Fund PRDirector of Resource Mobilization and Collaborations between Social Movements[email protected]
Coral AponteFlamboyan FoundationPolicy and Partner Engagement[email protected]
Maria Concepción DíazOxfam USProgram Manager[email protected]
Proviana ColónFundación Banco PopularProgram Manager[email protected]
Ian SeaveyYale University’s Jackson School of Global AffairsPredoctoral Fellow in International Security Studies[email protected]
Alberto VelázquezPuerto Rico Department of StatisticsSenior Project Manager[email protected]
Francisco Pesante González, PhDPuerto Rico Department of StatisticsProject manager and coordinator of the Academies and Workshops Program[email protected]
Deepak Lamba-NievesCenter for a New EconomyDirector of Research[email protected]
Merarys Rios-VargasU.S. Census BureauChief, Ethnicity and Ancestry Branch, Population Division[email protected]
Rachel MarksU.S. Census BureauChief, Racial Statistics Branch, Population Division[email protected]
Joe EvansKresge FoundationPortfolio Director and Social Investment Officer[email protected]
Eduardo CarreraPlatform for Social ImpactChief Executive Officer[email protected]
José Caraballo Cueto, PhDUniversity of Puerto Rico at Río PiedrasAssociate Professor[email protected]
Dulce del Rio-PinedaMujeres de Islas[email protected]
Mariana ReyesTaller Comunidad La Goyco
Lyvia N. Rodríguez Del ValleEl Enjambre[email protected]
Carlos Rodríguez SilvestreFlamboyan FoundationExecutive Director, PR[email protected]
Sofía Martínez-ÁlvarezTitín FoundationExecutive Director[email protected]
Beatriz PolhamusFundación Banco PopularExecutive Director[email protected]
Mary Ann GabinoPuerto Rico Community FoundationSenior Vicepresident[email protected]
Charlotte GossettHispanic FederationPR Chief Director[email protected]
Carolina CottoFundación Ángel RamosPrograms Officer[email protected]
Anja PaonessaFilantropía Puerto RicoMembership Officer[email protected]
Glenisse Pagán OrtizFilantropía Puerto RicoExecutive Director[email protected]
Richard CórdovaFilantropía Puerto RicoOperations Officer[email protected]
Xiomara Torres RiveraFilantropía Puerto RicoCommunications Manager[email protected]
Nicole MéndezFilantropía Puerto RicoOperations and Logistics Coordinator[email protected]
Joel FranquiFilantropía Puerto RicoProject Coordinator[email protected]
Karla VargasFilantropía Puerto RicoDirector of Strategic Initiatives[email protected]
Brian DíazFilantropía Puerto RicoMedia Content Creator[email protected]
Leonardo Laboy Beatriz LizardiArmonía de la MontañaArmonía de la Montaña[email protected]
Gina MalleyCamp TabonucoCamp Tabonuco[email protected]
Alondra PerezCentro EsperanzaCentro Esperanza[email protected]
Karla DuránEcoTienda La ChiwiEcoTienda La Chiwi[email protected]
JeyMa García y ValeriaFinca PajuilFinca Pajuil[email protected]
Andres AltraFriends of Puerto RicoFriends of Puerto Rico[email protected] [email protected]
Ashley AnahataHermittes Anahata FoundationHermittes Anahata Foundation[email protected]
Karen AlborsModo ConscienteModo Consciente[email protected]
Lucianne VelezPaz Para TiPaz Para Ti[email protected]
Belisa AlvarezTerequesTereques[email protected]
Vanessa CintrónTierra de LunaTierra de Luna[email protected]

General Convening Details

Registration: All convening sessions will be at the Caribe Hilton Hotel in San Juan, with the exception of our closing ‘Junte Social’, which will take place at  MADMi. Registration will open at 8:30 am on Wednesday, October 18th, right in front of Salón Flamingo on the 2nd floor. We encourage you to arrive early to pick up your badge and enjoy an early breakfast.

Dress code: There’s no strict dress code for the convening; your comfort is our priority. However, please keep in mind that hotel meeting rooms tend to have cooler temperatures, so having an extra jacket on hand might be a good idea.

Social Media: We’ll be actively posting on social media throughout the convening, and we invite you to join the conversation. Don’t forget to use our official event hashtags: #ExpandToAlign and #2023Convening in your posts. Let’s make our online presence as vibrant as our in-person gathering!

Parking: On-site parking is available at $25, or you can find a multi parking option in front of the hotel for $15. If you prefer not to use these parking facilities, you can easily opt for an Uber ride.

Spotify Playlist: Tune in Now & Set the Event Vibe! 🎶 2023 Annual Convening Playlist on Spotify.

Culture, Participation & Privacy Guidelines

We want you to experience our annual convening as a chance to continue building our philanthropic community by enabling collaborative discussions that allow diverse grantmakers to work together and scale up their impact in Puerto Rico. Discussions should be lively, yet respectful, and always seek to bridge the gaps between diverse opinions, cultures, interests, and backgrounds, while staying focused on our mission to improve the lives of the marginalized.

You may tag us on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, and use the #convenePR hashtag so other attendees can find your posts.

Sessions might be recorded for archival purposes and available for our members.

We may take photos or video of sessions and attendees.

This content is for FiPR use only and may appear on our website, newsletter, social media pages, or future promotional material.

While fundraising is prohibited, we do encourage you to share what you learn and to refrain from doing so if the speakers explicitly request confidentiality.

Please abide by our Culture, Participation & Privacy Policy.

COVID-19 Guidelines

Vaccination and masks are not required. The meeting room should allow us to be comfortably spaced. We understand that there will be a mix of perspectives and needs among group members, and we trust that we can all respect and support that diversity.

Stay at home if you’re sick or have been in close contact with anyone who tested positive for COVID-19.
Be respectful of anyone’s desire for space, face coverings or a touchless experience.

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